Second to the Joshua Tree itself, the fascinating sculptures and gravity-defying piles of rocks are one of most prominent features of the landscape in Joshua Tree National Park. The land looks as if a giant moved rocks into piles, leaving vast swaths of land boulder-free with towering stacks of stones scattered about, many sculpted into artistic forms. Read More →

The word Colorado is derived form the Spanish word for “reddish”, and was applied to the river that ran red-brown as it carried loads of sediment from eroding canyons along its route. Since the Glen Canyon Dam was erected to form Lake Powell, the river rarely runs its natural reddish-brown color and is usually clear Read More →

Nearly two billion years of Earth’s history are contained in the layers of rocks in the Grand Canyon. Gazing down into this vast chasm I had occasion to ponder the timescale of the canyon and of the planet. To better understand that timescale, to understand the changes that are recorded in those rocks dating back Read More →

Over 200 million years ago, during the Late Triassic Epoch, the land that now forms Arizona was on the supercontinent Pangea near the equator, in a tropical climate. Huge conifers towered over a low-lying land cut by rivers and streams. As the trees died and fell, many were carried downstream by the rivers, rolling and Read More →

We left Oliver Lee Memorial State Park to drive west. On this drive we crossed both the continental divide and the state line, entering Arizona, and even into a different desert, leaving the Chihauhaun for the Sonoran. Arizona is a much-awaited destination on this trip; we have now entered seasonal snowbird territory, so we expect to meet Read More →

New Mexico offers some truly otherworldly experiences; it’s no wonder UFO and alien theories abound in the area (we thought about visiting Roswell to learn about UFOs, but ultimately decided not to take the time). I previously told you about touring Carlsbad Caverns, which makes me feel like I am in a sci-fi castle, now Read More →

We chose to visit Carlsbad Caverns National Park because spelunking is an activity John has wanted to experience for sometime. The caves at Carlsbad are open even while most of the caves nationwide have been closed in an attempt to slow the spread of white-nose syndrome (if you don’t know about the ecological disaster that Read More →