We arrived at Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks on a Saturday in early April. The park was still in winter-mode, with most of the campgrounds closed for the season. The one campground on the Sequoia National Park side that was open was completely full (unsurprising, as it was a Saturday). Another campground on the Kings Read More →

When we visited San Diego my friend who lives there was out of town, so we agreed to meet for a hike on Mount San Jacinto, east of Los Angeles, the following weekend. Mount San Jacinto State Park has two campgrounds and the adjacent San Bernardino National Forest also has some campgrounds. Out of all Read More →

At the cave tour in Carlsbad Caverns we met a young couple on a similar trip as us, only headed the opposite direction. On their recommendation we decided to take surfing lessons in San Diego and headed there from Joshua Tree. Our first evening there we took a night-time walk on Mission Bay path to see the Pacific Read More →

Many people have recommended Joshua Tree National Park to visit, so we drove here from Flagstaff. The 340 mile drive was the longest we have driven in a day in months. It was tiring but we made it to nearest campground just as the rangers were closing up. By this point in our trip we Read More →

After backpacking to the river and back, we stayed at Mather Campground in the park a little longer to regroup and see the last few sights we had yet to see. An entire village resides in the park, complete with grocery store and a branch of the state library, so we didn’t need to leave Read More →

The word Colorado is derived form the Spanish word for “reddish”, and was applied to the river that ran red-brown as it carried loads of sediment from eroding canyons along its route. Since the Glen Canyon Dam was erected to form Lake Powell, the river rarely runs its natural reddish-brown color and is usually clear Read More →

Over 200 million years ago, during the Late Triassic Epoch, the land that now forms Arizona was on the supercontinent Pangea near the equator, in a tropical climate. Huge conifers towered over a low-lying land cut by rivers and streams. As the trees died and fell, many were carried downstream by the rivers, rolling and Read More →

At the top of Wasson Peak in Saguaro National Park we met two local women also out for a hike. I asked them if they could identify the various mountains in the distance, and the more knowledgeable of the pair obliged by pointing out Santa Catalina Mountains, the Rincon Mountains, and the Santa Rita Mountains. Additionally, they Read More →

I was surprised when the ranger at the Sabino Canyon Visitor Center recommended the “Prison Camp” campground for our stay in the Coronado National Forest. Despite the unappealing name, we headed there because of its location on the trail we planned to hike. An interpretive sign at the campground explains why the campground is called Read More →